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The Tale of the Prince and the Magic Carpet

The Prince and the Magic Carpet

This beautifully illustrated children’s book The Tale of the Prince and the Magic Carpet was written by James Dyson’s father Alec, whilst posted in India during the Second World War.

The Prince and the Magic Carpet

The book, published by Blackie & Son of London and Glasgow, was inspired by his surroundings and was written for and features his three children – a blonde James and his brother and sister.

The Prince and the Magic Carpet

Whilst discussing blog content, Alice (our Head of Contract Sales and Marketing) suggested exploring the origins of the magic carpet at which point Deirdre mentioned this book.

The Prince and the Magic Carpet

We thought it would be lovely to share some of its beautiful illustrations and background with you.

The Prince and the Magic Carpet

Only one tatty copy of the novel remains which James Dyson has now copied for his siblings and grandchildren to enjoy.  A lovely legacy given that Alec Dyson died when James was only 9 and a wonderful link to Deirdre’s passion for carpet design.

The Prince and the Magic Carpet


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A message from Deirdre Dyson and her Team

Given the unprecedented CV-19 situation, for our staff and clients safety and wellbeing the gallery will close from Thursday 19th March until further notice.

Despite our gallery space closing temporarily, the Deirdre Dyson website is a great resource to browse Deirdre’s rug designs and our handy quote calculator gives you an immediate retail price.

We’ll be working from home so the best way to contact us is via email if you require quotes, shipping quotes, samples or anything else and we’ll get back to you as soon as we possibly can.

We are working hard to ensure we continue to provide normal service levels to all clients awaiting deliveries and we endeavour to continue to meet expected delivery times.  We will of course be in touch if this changes in any way.

Stay safe and well everyone and we look forward to getting back to normal when this extraordinary time passes.


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The Lifecycle of a Hand-knotted Carpet or what happens while you are waiting 14-16 weeks

After we’ve helped you choose the right design in the right colours and size to suit your scheme, the finished artwork and exact colour palette is sent to Nepal.

It takes 14-16 weeks to produce a hand knotted carpet, which can seem a long time in our world of instant gratification.

These images show just why your bespoke rug takes such a long time to make and some of the age-old artisan processes used at each stage of its production.

Sorting Wool
Sorting the raw wool
Carding Wool
Carding the wool
Yarn making
Spinning the yarn
Raw Yarn
Bales of yarn ready for dyeing
Bales of Yarn
Bales of yarn ready for dyeing
Dyeing Yarn
Dyeing the yarn
Dyed yarn drying
Dyed yarn drying
Weavers at Work
Weaving
Weavers at Work
Weaving
Finished WINDOWS carpet on loom
Finished WINDOWS carpet on loom
Washing
Carpet being washed

Once it’s washed, dried and checked your carpet is shipped directly to our London showroom and the finished product is revealed!

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Uncovering History

We thought we’d share this piece of history uncovered during the refurbishment of our showroom at 554 Kings Road – a newspaper from 1897, parts completely preserved and stowed away behind a wall.

Newspaper

The Situations Vacant page has an interesting entry showing the rates of pay for various household staff – from £20-28 for cooks to a mere £10 a year for ‘girls’.

Newspaper (close up)

It’s been fascinating watching layers of history appear as the building has been gutted. Pictured below are scraps of wallpaper and paint revealed on the first floor.

Wallpaper

And most exciting of all the original sign for ‘Loud & Western Ltd’ laundry was preserved almost perfectly beneath the existing shop front.

Refurbishment


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Shape-shifting STREAMER

We’ve just delivered a round version of STREAMER to a client in the US and it’s a great example of a how a design can be adapted.

Shape-shifting STREAMER

Our sample carpets are generally produced as rectangles to a standard size of 1.7m x 2.35m but as with colour, size and shape can be altered to suit, in this case our Designer Nichola created a circular version only marginally altering Deirdre’s original design.

Shape-shifting STREAMER

Here’s a shot of the carpet on the loom in Nepal, the client chose to keep Deirdre’s original colour choice.

Shape-shifting STREAMER

This is a portion of the finished carpet being checked in our showroom, not the greatest image but it does give a real sense of the fluid effect created by the two shades of red silk used in the streamer.

Shape-shifting STREAMER

Finally, the finished carpet in its new home.

Shape-shifting STREAMER

The ribbon is one of Deirdre’s signature motifs and STREAMER is understandably a hugely popular design, we’ve even produced it as a stair runner for a JIGSAW clothing store.

Shape-shifting STREAMER


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Deirdre Dyson bespoke PSYCHE rug in a New York Bedroom

Psyche

New York based interiors company Sara Story Design’s starting point for this superb bedroom scheme was Deirdre’s PSYCHE carpet from the Butterfly Collection.

This version is larger than the original and hand tufted (here in the UK) as opposed to hand knotted but uses Deirdre’s original colour choice.

The room, created for the client’s daughter, references the turquoise and purple in the carpet to create a vibrant and cohesive yet restful space, we like!

Photo Credit: Sara Story Design

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Edison’s Guide to Using Angles, Asymmetry & Geometrics

Many of Deirdre’s designs feature angular motifs, examples include this year’s PINNACLE, OPTIC & REFLECTIONS as well as classic designs such as BI-LINE and INTERLINK.

In the second part of his occassional series on elements of interior design, Company Manager Edison gives his tips on incorporating angles of every type into a scheme.

I love a punchy interior, something that ‘kicks’ and makes you think.

Adding angular, geometric and asymmetrical forms that work against more structured lines is a great way to introduce some ‘base’ into your space.

Concrete Table
Concrete table Brazil by Architect Guto Requena

With an ever-increasing trend to open up spaces, larger areas can often lack impact and dimension, particularly where large expanses of straight walls and ceilings dominate within the conventions of modern apartment living or the converted, traditional home.

The introduction of irregular forms, can also be used to dissect and zone spaces within smaller areas, making them appear larger. This happens as the eye is drawn to the fragmented areas of a space, rather than seeing one small area as a complete ‘whole’.

Kitchen
Image Breathe Architecture

The compact kitchen (above) is a perfect example.

With a basic run of flat, regular cupboards and cabinets, the use of an asymmetrical counter/room divider and geometric tiles, breaks the monotony, zones areas and adds dimension, interest and depth.

Kitchen
Images MCK Architects

Kitchen

The kitchen/living space designed by MCK (above) is another example of well thought out use of the angular, irregular form.

It divides the space with visual interest, allowing for a balance of movement, without becoming awkward.  The introduction of the rounded sofa in the background and the rounded backs of the bistro dining chairs, soften the overall effect and add warmth to the interior by way of colour.

This stunning staircase is another example of clever juxtapositioning.

Staircase
Staircase by Architect Dolphy Levy and Interior Designer Adi Hamitzer of Levy Hamitzer Architects.

If sharp angled staircases and asymmetrical ceilings are not quite your thing or purely just impossible to achieve, then you can always introduce these elements by use of decorative accessories and furnishings, without having to move home or demolish any walls!

Of course rugs are an easy way of adding angular forms, our PINNACLE and CRUMPLE carpets are two perfect examples.

PINNACLE
Deirdre Dyson Exclusive Carpets and Rugs PINNACLE
CRUMPLE
Deirdre Dyson Exclusive Carpets and Rugs CRUMPLE

Alternatively why not try introducing some decorative wallpaper to make a statement feature wall such as Angles by Erica Wakerly

On an even smaller scale, think Lights by James Dieter, as featured November 2015’s Elle Decoration page 109 or some black geometric inspired vases such as these, to add that delicate angle on a shelf or mantelpiece.’

Vases


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CDQ INSPIRATION PAGE

CDQ Inspiration page

We love the newly designed Chelsea Design Quarter website and particularly like the ‘Inspiration’ page – an ever changing moodboard featuring fabulous product and lifestyle shots from all CDQ partner collections.


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Our Largest ever Hand-Knotted Commissions

We recently completed our largest ever bespoke hand-knotted carpet commissions, each measuring approx. 6.5 x 6m (over 38 square metres).

Deirdre Dyson Exclusive Carpets & Rugs
Deirdre Dyson Exclusive Carpets & Rugs

 

 

Both carpets were created for a private client for use in adjoining private offices by Deirdre who, inspired by the surroundings and detail in one of the upholstery fabrics, created a selection of concepts from which the two final designs were chosen.

Deirdre Dyson

Given the scale, Deirdre decided to make a dramatic statement with grading – creating a palette of 13 colours from muted cream to darkest brown for both designs and selecting an ox-blood red, also used in the upholstery, to highlight the ‘stitching’ and ‘branch’ motifs on the designs.

Swatches

Stitching

Stitching

The finished carpets are stunning and a testament to the incredible attention to detail and craftsmanship of our Nepalese weavers and an absolute masterclass in grading, an astonishing feat on this scale.

Stitching and Grading

Twilight

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