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PANTONE’S COLOUR OF THE YEAR – UV

In Edison‘s occasional series on interior design he explores how best to bring Pantone’s color of the year for 2018, UV, into your interior.

So, the colour for 2018 is Pantone Ultra Violet 18-3838.

And people, do we need some ultra violet after such a dull autumn and long winter spell? Definitely a yes!

This year’s colour is full of vibrancy, leaving you the options to go full force or alternatively, down play it as an accent colour to punchy effect.

As with any rich colour, look for the complimentary colours (usually at the opposite end of the colour wheel) to either lift it or cool it.

Violets are naturally on the feminine side of the spectrum and work best when paired with concentrated golds and yellows in restrained amounts. UV is the perfect accompaniment to areas filled with rich cream backgrounds that need a warming uplift.

This playful trumpet style lamp by Delightfull shows just how well these tones mix.

Masculinise violet by contrasting against black or slate. Keep metals to dull or brushed golds and bronze whilst adding natural wood elements for a soothing harmony, as shown in the following image.

If the prospect of Ultra Violet partitions and spaces feels rather overwhelming, then stick to blocking the colour to fixtures, fittings and accessories, rather than pasting it on the walls.

The Strappo and Silenzio encased washbasins by Domenico de Palo and shown here finished in violet, is a perfect example.

Decorative cushions with Ultra Violet undertones (V&A for John Lewis) , simple iridescent glass vases (Habitat) and striking violet patterned fabric by Melo Design are great ways to introduce this energy on a less permanent (and imposing) way.

 

 

Or introduce UV elements on the floor with our DEVILS BIT SCABIOUS or DUSK carpet.

 

And just in case you’d rather wear it, be seen out in vibrant style with a dash of Tom Ford’s ‘Wet Violet’ lip gloss. Just perfect for a rainy day.

 

 


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Edison’s Introduction to Colour & Colour Selection

Our Company Manager Edison Abidi is a trained Interior Designer and every now and then he’ll share some of his expertise here on the Blog – today it’s probably the most essential element of your bespoke rug design – colour.

‘People can be daunted by the fact that we have over 2,000 colours to choose from when designing your bespoke carpet but fear not! We are here to help and make the whole process as smooth as possible.

At the end of the day, it’s not just about the quantity of colour involved, but most importantly, it’s about how the carpet will eventually harmonise with your environment.

The finished carpet should fit in, create a sense of order and be visually engaging without necessarily being the centre of attention.

Most interiors evolve from an idea or concept or they can just develop naturally over time. Whichever way, they will or should express something of the people that live in them.

Colour will ultimately play an important part of this overall expression.

Keeping the above in mind, we can utilise some very simple formulas (that anyone can adopt) and drill down to find the perfect colours for your carpet.

All these techniques use The Colour Wheel as a starting point.

Colour Wheel

From the three basic primary colours of yellow, blue and red, we can create our secondary colours of green, orange and purple.

Mixing these secondary colours gives us a further palette of yellow-orange, red-orange, red-purple, blue-purple, blue-green and yellow-green.

Colour Wheel

Now imagine breaking that down even further, having all those options of light to heavy saturation for every hue? Well, that’s a lot of colour to consider for anyone (hence our vast selection of colours!)

Colour Wheel

Take a look at a section from our colour range to see the subtle variations involved.

With a little thought we can select colours that work in your interior, and together on your carpet, using these further colour ‘rules’:

Harmonious Colours

Firstly, a colour scheme based on those found in nature, is the most ‘natural’ one, obviously. Colours such as red/brown/green/yellow are all harmonious colours and any of these, in whatever hue, should sit well together.

Colour Wheel

Complementary Colours

Colours that are positioned directly opposite each other on the colour wheel. Think blue/orange or red/green. You can then veer off to the left or right of either of these for example, turquoise/brown or turquoise/orange.

Analogue Colours

Another colour scheme can be based on analogue colours, which are colours that sit side by side on a colour wheel. Think red/purple-red/purple as similarly used in our PLECTRUMS carpet (detail illustrated below).

PLECTRUMS detail

Again this principle can be applied to colours from the same palette such as dark to light in shades of green, see FOREST MOSAIC or the grading in TORN BETWEEN design (detail illustrated).

TORN BETWEEN detail

Texture

Like I said, it’s not just about the quantity of colour used. Sometimes harmony is created by not using much colour at all.

Take a look at our SUHAILAH carpet (detail illustrated).

SUHAILAH detail

By only using one colour, the carpet is beautifully harmonised simply by the contrast of silk against the wool background. Perfect for an interior where enough colour might already exist.’