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OUR GALLERY MAY BE CLOSED BUT WE CONTINUE TO DESIGN & OPERATE REMOTELY

Following government guidelines our London gallery will close from 5pm on Wednesday 5th November. We anticipate reopening at 11am on Wednesday 2nd December.

The gallery may be closed but we continue to design and operate remotely.

Please visit www.deirdredyson.com to browse Deirdre’s full range of bespoke rug designs and get an immediate retail quote using our Price Calculator.

For all design enquiries including trade quotes, colour tufts and samples please email us on sales@deirdredyson.com and we will respond as soon as possible.

 If you would rather speak to us by phone please call 020 73844464, leave a message and we will get back to you very soon.

Our Paris gallery remains open by appointment.  Please contact Julia@deirdredyson.com who will be happy to arrange your dedicated visit.

For company updates please follow our social media channels.

Stay safe and well.

Deirdre Dyson & Team


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Dulux Colour of The Year – Beige needn’t mean Boring

Company Manager Edison, a trained Interior Designer, gives his take on Dulux Colour of the Year for 2021.

Paint brand Dulux, has selected ‘Brave Ground’ as their colour for 2021.

A staple interior choice of colour since the 80’s and dominating the early 00’s, beige is one palette that we just can’t seem to get enough of. It’s a familiar colour, it’s warm (particularly for cooler climates) and it can be applied to pretty much any interior design scheme. However, it also has an association with being boring and safe and some might say, unimaginative.

Here are a few examples where ‘boring beige’ can be just as exciting and as playful as other bold, more statement colours.

 

Picture Credit: Mat Architects

In this apartment designed by MAT Architects, the beige walls are perfectly paired with the tones of the wood panelling, making this space inviting and warm against the crisp white ceiling, lighting and cool grey concrete floors. Tonal fabrics, artwork and plant life add texture, sculpture, dimension and visual interest. As beige is an absorbing, earthy colour it sits well with a myriad of nature’s more vibrant colours.

As featured in Home-Designing.com

The kitchen area carries the colour palette through by way of the beige terrazzo on the kitchen island. Just like white, black accessories silhouette perfectly against a warm beige background.

Deirdre Dyson’s EAGLE carpet incorporates the beige palette within a bold, statement design that works best large scale for a fuller impact. Keeping a neutral decorative background, a beige coloured carpet can be just as bold as something more patterned and colourful. It’s all about balance.

Beige comes in a variety of tones from more putty based to greyer and greener hues, so the scale of warmth can be adjusted accordingly, making it a hugely versatile choice of colour.

Here is a work in progress for a recent client project, using our SLIDES design.

Beige works particularly well when combined with pinks and reds.

 

 

The LIGHT FRAGMENTS design from this years’ LOOKING GLASS Collection is a testament to that. Deirdre has mixed the various abstract elements in grey, charcoal, light and dark beige with pops of Bordeaux and pink to create just the right combination of statement with subtlety.

If beige just isn’t you colour, then it’s a problem easily solved as we can adapt and change colours on any design from a choice of 5,000 colours. The only ‘possible’ problem you may have, are which colours to choose…?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Deirdre Dyson London Gallery Re-opens!

Our London gallery has now re-opened Monday –  Friday between the hours of 11am-5pm.

We will operate on a ‘by appointment only basis’ observing social distancing rules, and operating in as safe and efficient a way as possible.

Our new opening hours will apply for the foreseeable future, to either continue further or adapt as required depending on government advice.

For further information on visiting the gallery or how we aim to do this responsibly, please contact us on: sales@deirdredyson.com


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Madame Butterfly – an exploration of Deirdre Dyson’s love of opera

As life has changed dramatically for us all over the past few weeks and inspired by a recent production of Madame Butterfly at the ENO (now sadly closed), we thought we’d touch on some things close to Deirdre’s heart, namely opera and the charity Deirdre supports with her annual productions.

The arts and culture has taken a body blow during this crisis and we look forward to a time soon when theatre’s and galleries open their doors again.

We recently went to see the ENO’s production of Madame Butterfly at the London Coliseum

Wowed by the beauty of the music, performances and sublime staging by the late film director Anthony Minghella, we thought it was the perfect opportunity to explore opera, something close to Deirdre’s heart and the hugely important charity which benefits from Deirdre’s annual opera at her home.

Kimono’s designed by the late Anthony Minghella

Deirdre has always been a talented singer, beginning to sing solos in church at the age of 7.  She was also in a junior choir, becoming leader at 17.  It was at this time Deirdre began voice training. 

Detail Kimono by Anthony Minghella

For the most part Deirdre has sung choral music in semi-professional choirs but during the last 10 years she has studied opera with a coach and hosts an annual charity opera event at her home where she sings one piece with the professional performers.

She still sings solos occasionally at other charity functions and loves many different operas but has particular favourite arias. 

A favourite opera director is Canadian Robert Carsen whose modern concepts and modern sets really appeal.

The charity Deirdre and her husband James support with their opera evening is CURE EB of which she is a patron. The charity raises vital funds to aid research into Epidermolysis Bullosa, a little known, genetic skin blistering condition that affects over 500,000 people around the world.  

The charity was established by Sharmila and James Collins for their daughter Sohana who was born with this dreadful condition where the skin blisters internally as well as externally and who has not been out of pain since the day she was born 19 years ago.

The care involved is hard to imagine and children with this condition rarely live beyond 20 however this charity is steaming ahead with major breakthroughs in cell research and we are all praying hard for Sohana and all other children who suffer.

Click here to donate to this hugely worthwhile research.

Finally we can’t mention Madame Butterfly without linking to Deirdre’s Butterfly rug collection – these vibrant hand knotted carpets feature designs inspired by the patterns on Butterfly and moth wings and includes designs such as BORBOLETA, FARFALLA, PALOMA, PSYCHE and LEPKE  

Deirdre Dyson FARFALLA hand knotted wool & silk rug

View these and other rug designs on our website or contact us for design, colour advice or a quote.

 


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A message from Deirdre Dyson and her Team

Given the unprecedented CV-19 situation, for our staff and clients safety and wellbeing the gallery will close from Thursday 19th March until further notice.

Despite our gallery space closing temporarily, the Deirdre Dyson website is a great resource to browse Deirdre’s rug designs and our handy quote calculator gives you an immediate retail price.

We’ll be working from home so the best way to contact us is via email if you require quotes, shipping quotes, samples or anything else and we’ll get back to you as soon as we possibly can.

We are working hard to ensure we continue to provide normal service levels to all clients awaiting deliveries and we endeavour to continue to meet expected delivery times.  We will of course be in touch if this changes in any way.

Stay safe and well everyone and we look forward to getting back to normal when this extraordinary time passes.


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Deirdre Dyson’s inspiration for the LOOKING GLASS rug collection

Deirdre’s 2020 collection has just launched at Maison et Objet, Paris.

These hand knotted designs were inspired by Deirdre’s observations of colours and forms through glass, glass objects and water.  Nine new designs take her carpets in an entirely different direction.

Read all about Deirdre’s inspiration for each carpet in the LOOKING GLASS Collection here in her own words:

Last summer I found myself mesmerised by everything I could see through glass and water, particularly on holiday where the sun made everything glitter.

I decided to try to make my designs seem ‘glassy’ even though I was working in wool!  If I failed, I might create something unexpected – I love the challenge of the unknown result and you only discover if you explore.

GLASS CUBES

I started with two little rectangular vases of different colour, photographed them and analysed the colours they created when they were overlapping each other.

I designed two simple geometric shapes representing the cubes and inserted the exact colours from my palette of wool poms to represent where the two colours overlapped which gives the illusion of looking through glass.

I finished the piece with wide silken borders to add the shine and glitter of glass.  I was hugely surprised and excited at the finished carpet which really looked glassy and also very three dimensional.  This encouraged me to explore several different ideas about glass.

SLIVERS

The next attempt led on from this overlapping idea.  I didn’t even need real glass, I just created four shapes, selected four colours and overlapped them creating the colour I imagined would occur if they existed.

What made this carpet successful was the grading I decided to do within each piece.  I had to select about 8 grades of each colour to grade from dark to light, and from the outside in, to give the illusion of seeing through the glass.

This was the first time that we had tried to grade within a random shape which was very difficult to specify for our craftspeople and a new challenge for them too.  Again they succeeded and have given me a new skill to work with in the future.

TRANSPARENT was designed from an existing vase with various shapes and colours in the glass.

I created my own shapes and colours and again looked for the overlapping colours that I knew would occur.  Because the inspiration was a vase I added some silk highlights to represent light against the outside of the vase.  Each of these highlights was a paler colour of the colour underneath.

LIGHT FRAGMENTS

I have a very simple water flask and thought of two different things that I could do with it.  One was to paint exactly what I could see inside through the water which were random abstract shapes and colours which looked distorted and bent through the water and also to add highlights again of paler colours and in silk as seen on the outside of the vase.

LOOKING THROUGH

The second idea was to paint what was behind the vase ie. boat rigging and blue cushions with reflections on a shiny table and then paint the distortions of these within the flask without drawing the outline of the flask.  I knew from exercises in my student days that without trying, the flask would slowly appear and it did, and it does in the carpet, although I made the colours within the flask a tiny bit paler to help it reveal itself.

 

FLOATING GLASS

Being on a boat made me think of all the bits of worn glass that we often find washed up on beaches so another idea was to include chinks of floating glass in a flowing, watery setting.

LIGHT BETWEEN

I had used a great deal of colour in the collection so finally decided to do some monochromatic grading with a path of light and two simple glassy bars in silk that you feel you can see through as they pass over the greys and light between.

This was an accidental idea caused by placing a plain glass bowl, which had a glass ball as its base, on top of a patterned glass plate.  This created a magnification which I decided to represent in silk with just a tiny lightening of the colour inside the area.

STAINED GLASS

On a visit to the Amalfi Cathedral and in one of the small rooms at the back behind all the magnificence of marble and gold was a small plain window high up with beautiful, simple pale colours.  The light behind it made it impossible to photograph but the colours stayed in my mind and I thought that in silk, it might make a lovely wall hanging for a windowless room.
Click here to view all Deirdre’s new designs online or contact us to arrange a viewing of the new collection at our Kings Road gallery.

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CDQ Autumn Event Collaboration with Stephenson Wright and Jan Erika revealed

We are huge fans of Interior Designers Stephenson Wright whose combined attention to detail, eye for colour and refined aesthetic translate their clients needs and requirements into beautiful homes.

Juliette and Natalie recently expanded their portfolio to include bespoke furniture design and have created a capsule collection which launched at this year’s Decorex.

Some of these beautiful and functional pieces such as their Plink and Plonk occasional tables and Barrel stools, are uniquely customised by Artist Jan Erika.

Jan is a prolific artist whose bold graphic style works brilliantly with these classic contemporary Stephenson Wright designs.

We love to celebrate all things handmade and bespoke and the launch of Chelsea Design Quarters Designers page, a directory of local Interior Designers celebrated by the CDQ Autumn Event allowed us to showcase the exceptional talent of Stephenson Wright and Jan Erika with Deirdre’s bold and vibrant MANDARIN wool and silk rug.

Edison’s concept of double height banners making the most of the gallery’s atrium ran to 19m and Jan’s bold ‘Zebramane’ brushstrokes create an eye catching backdrop for Deirdre’s rug from this year’s PLUMAGE Collection and Jan’s customised tops for Stephenson Wright’s Plink and Plonk tables, their black scalloped bases reflecting the monochrome banners and black detailing in Deirdre’s rug design.

The CDQ Autumn Event culminates in the CDQ Raffle on Thursday 21st November with an exclusive event at Tom Faulkner.

By purchasing a ticket you support the invaluable work of homeless charity Glass Door and get the chance to win a selection of superb prizes donated by CDQ members such as a night at The Bath Priory on a revolutionary Ammique bed, a Martin Brudnizki Studio light donated by  Drummonds Bathrooms a Baby Soho Drum stool by George Smith, door knobs from Haute Deco , Stephenson Wright limited edition gin bottle customised by Jan, a Lily Cocktail table by  Tom Faulkner Tickets can be purchased here

 


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YOUR CHANCE TO WIN! ENTER THE CDQ RAFFLE & SUPPORT GLASS DOOR

The Chelsea Design Quarter Autumn raffle supporting the essential work of local homeless charity Glass Door is now live!
A full list of fabulous prizes donated by CDQ members such as a gift pack from Deirdre Dyson including a signed framed artwork by Jan Erika (pictured) can be found here
We’ll soon soon be revealing a special collaboration with interior design duo StephensonWright and Jan Erika to coincide with the event.
Tickets are £10 each and can be purchased in any CDQ showroom or online with all proceeds going to Glass Door.

The draw itself will take place at a party on the evening of 21st November at the Tom Faulkner showroom.
If you would like to attend on the 21st, you must RSVP with your raffle ticket number/s to: chelseadesginquarter@gmail.com.
Places will be allocated in order of tickets sold.

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The Design Process – your carpet from inspiration to delivery…

Every Deirdre Dyson carpet or rug is by its nature unique.

HARELQUIN hand knotted wool and silk rug from this years Plumage Rug Collection

As an entirely bespoke product, no two designs will ever be exactly the same, whether hand knotted or gun tufted, Deirdre’s carpets are made to last and the ancient processes involved in their manufacture take time.

Each year Deirdre creates a new themed rug collection, but these designs are just the starting point, Deirdre Dyson rugs are infinitely customisable – colours, size, composition and the design itself can all be altered to suit a client’s exact requirements.

Whether Deirdre’s colour choices are perfect for your scheme or if you want to create your custom version of a rug design, the process remains the same and the result is a luxurious, heirloom quality rug or carpet of your own.

THE CREATION OF A COLLECTION:

Deirdre colouring her initial sketch for her CORAL rug design

Deirdre’s carpets begin with a simple, hand coloured, pencil drawing.

Over the year’s Deirdre has sought inspiration in nature, the sky, sea and shoreline, stones, flowers, leaves and trees to the abstract – geometric and organic forms or the refraction of light.

Deirdre has complete creative control over every design in her annual rug collections.

Working with her Designer Nichola to digitise the design, together they refine it if necessary and add Deirdre’s carefully selected colours to precisely match her vision for that rug.

Colour is of course key. Deirdre selects from over 5,000 colour poms in wool and silk – her ‘paint box’.

Some of the 5,000 wool and silk poms from which Deirdre selects the colourways for each collection rug

This is a considered process, where the colours are observed in different lights and times of day to accurately reflect their relationship with each other and realise Deirdre’s concept perfectly.

Deirdre’s eye for colour is fundamental – as a Fine Artist she has both the innate skill and technical knowledge to find just the right juxtaposition of colours or the perfect tones to create an intricate colour grade (the subtle change of colour from dark to light as seen in rug designs such as EAGLE pictured below)

Detail of grading on Deirdre Dyson’s EAGLE hand knotted rug

Digitally colour matching Deirdre’s pom selection is a highly skilled task, Nichola has worked with Deirdre for almost twenty years and no amount of technology can mimic her colour matching abilities, which again can take days to refine, dependant on the hours of daylight available and how the colours appear in different lights, both on screen and in print.

Nichola’s accurate digital versions of the rug designs are stored for future adaptation and exact colour-perfect print versions are approved by Deirdre (or a client) before manufacture.

MANUFACTURE:

Once the design is finished to Deirdre’s exacting standard, it is sent to our trusted weavers in Nepal or, if gun tufted in 100% wool, to our manufacturers in Yorkshire.

We have long standing relationships with both and Deirdre has a strong, personal rapport with each. Communicating new design ideas involves close discussions regarding the technical elements involved.

The gun tufting process which uses 100% wool and is suitable for some designs.

Gun tufting is by far the quicker option (though no less careful and considered) and generally the suggested method of production for commercial projects or areas with higher footfall.

Given the limitations of tufting however, not all designs are suitable for this type of manufacture.

As with hand knotting quality control is paramount, with colour meticulously matched and designs executed to millimetre perfection.

HAND KNOTTING:

However, Deirdre Dyson is primarily known for her hand knotted rugs and has built her brand’s reputation on their luxurious quality.

The vast majority of bespoke rugs and all collection carpets are hand knotted by our weavers in Nepal using traditional techniques which are indigenous to the area and have been passed down through the generations.

Hand knotting creates a dense, luxurious pile but allows for the finest of detail and subtle colour transitions which are impossible to replicate by machine.

The art of hand knotting not only takes skill and patience, it involves age old techniques and tools which have remained unchanged over centuries.

One of our skilled weavers at work.

Climate is crucial to the process, as heat and sunshine is essential; from fixing dyes to drying and stretching the finished carpet, therefore the Monsoon season from June to August prolongs production time.

Additionally, weavers observe religious holidays and don’t work during these periods (particularly in January and February)  Ultimately these carpets are intrinsically linked with Nepalese traditions and the Nepalese way of life.

Deirdre Dyson is a long-time partner of Goodweave ensuring no child labour is involved in rug making and that the highest level of work practices and standards are maintained for weavers and their families.

DYEING:

All Deirdre’s chosen colours are colour matched exactly, amazingly this is all done by the highly skilled dye master by eye.

Raw yarn being dyed to exactly the right shade.

The dye master mixes scrupulously measured quantities of pigments to create accurate dyes.  The hand carded Tibetan wool and Chinese silk is then turned by hand in vats of the dye until precisely the right shade is achieved.

The dyed yarn is then allowed to dry naturally.  As it dries the heat of the sun fixes the dye which is then spun by hand to the correct ply and thickness.

Dyed yarn drying in the sun.

MAPPING:

Meanwhile, exact mapping of the design has taken place to create a template which hangs above the loom from which the weavers work.

This intricate graph carefully maps the position of every knot and colour change within the design, all painstakingly reproduced from Deirdre’s original and replicated by the weavers by eye.

WEAVING:

The hand knotting process itself is incredible to watch, the speed and dexterity of our weavers is truly astonishing, especially where there are complex grades (such as SEA WASH  pictured on the loom below) or intricately detailed carpets with fine lines (such as PLUMES)

Deirdre Dyson’s SEAWASH rug on the loom

The weaver’s create knots on the vertical ‘warp’ threads using a metal rod, an incredible 100 knots fit the area of a postage stamp which gives an indication of the intricacy involved.

Once a row is complete it is hammered tightly on to the row below and the yarn is cut to create a rough pile.

FINISHING:

When weaving is complete, each carpet is carefully washed, stretched and dried in the open air then precisely trimmed by hand to the correct pile height.

The fascinating and intricate carving process then takes place, where specific design elements are carefully clipped around to create definition.

Finally, the carpet is bound around the edges with matching yarn and our leather Deirdre Dyson label is attached.

Deirdre Dyson Exclusive Carpets and Rugs Label

Once approved, the carpet is then ready for packing and shipping back to our gallery in London.

A standard size rug will take approximately 14-16 weeks to complete from artwork sign off – with the production time rising depending on size and complexity of design.

Each element in the creation of your rug involves skill and a level of precision which cannot be rushed, this is ultimately an artisan process assisted by technology but not necessarily expedited by it.

The crucial elements of rug design and making are slow and considered and stand out in our world of mass production and instant gratification, the wait is worth it and the result is of the highest quality and designed to last a lifetime.